Are unlicensed bookmakers New Zealand safe?

When one gets into the world of betting, he usually does it for what is closest to him. The reality of the New Zealand market is that the houses most used by the average bettor are those that are most advertised on television, radio or the internet, or those that offer physical premises more frequently. But are they the best? Well, partly yes. And, in part, no.a

Licensed bookmakers

As we said, in part they are the best because they are the ones that make it easier for us to start betting. Normally, whoever starts in the world commits a million mistakes that do not allow us to see if the difference between one and the other is really enough to talk about better or worse, so let's think about a person who has spent months reading and who has even done tests without investing money to see if he controls minimally what he does.

But, in part, they are not the best by far: worse odds as a result of a very low payout, limits to winners, information shared between houses...

However, this negative side does not become so visible when you start, because you will not be limited so quickly nor will you be aware of the matter of the payout until you investigate a little more.

When assessing whether online bookmakers are safe, it is essential to be clear and differentiate legal gambling (with a license) from illegal gambling (without a license).

Unlicensed bookmakers

And, this is where the houses without license New Zealand . Those more “professional” houses that curiously, are known as Asian, are based in countries such as Curacao (Pinnacle), the Philippines (SBOBet), Costa Rica (5Dimes), ... and, of course, they don't have gambling license in New Zealand . Translate: it is not legal for a New Zealand citizen to bet on them directly.

We must know that not only is it not legal to play at these unlicensed bookmakers New Zealand for any New Zealand, it is that we are also not protected in case something happens that harms us. Playing in the New Zealand bookies, despite having many things against, we can denounce and try some legal action that ends up reporting us the deserved benefit, but if we get sucked into the “Asian”, we will not be able to do absolutely nothing.

Now well: is it safe to bet on the well-known Asians? From the personal experience of many people, we could say yes. There have almost never been problems with income or withdrawals, maybe at most some procedure takes longer than usual, but the figures end up being clear.

It requires, of course, a sufficient level of English to understand you with the intermediaries and to be able to "discuss" with them if necessary, but nothing that even with google translator (a tool that, I'm afraid, more than one of them uses) cannot be solved.

However, one must be aware of the limitations of each. Entering Asia requires a considerably higher bank than we would need in New Zealand, so it's not worth that I put $ 50 today, I'm gambling and if I lose them I'll put more next weekend.

Asia is a redoubt for big game gamblers, those who think about the long term and not about singing greens, those who know that they will fail, perfectly, half of the bets they place.

On how to enter, there are a thousand pages that tell the methodology and how to do it. But it must be clear that if we decide to take the step, we enter a legal vacuum where no one has our back and, although the risk is minimal, it will not be us who are risking the money, since the account in the bookie will have been created under the name of a stranger of another nationality.

However, despite not being in our name, we must know that the amounts won must be declared in the relevant form . Again, on the subject there are a thousand pages and websites that tell how to properly tax the income generated by this method.

We must declare about the profit of sports betting in all bookmakers. Don't miss our guide on how sports betting is taxed .

As a summary, remember that it is not you who really play the money, but it is your responsibility.

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Editor
Ines Ledo
Editor of the Innovate Change